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This page dedicated to all the …rainn (Fir Bolg, Belgae) Celtic Surnames of …ire. This list is nearly complete, and in time undoubtedly a few more …rainn names will be uncovered and added to the list. Because of tribal assimilation, extinction, and battlefield alliances - the origin of many of Ireland's ancient surnames is today extremely difficult to determine. This list is as accurate as research can substantiate.

When the Greek writer, Ptolomey, wrote about the Iverni - he was speaking to us about the ancient tribal groups known as the Belgae, Fir Bolg and …rainn (all names for the same celtic peoples). The true definition of "Fir Bolg" according to the respected celtic scholar Tůmas F. ”Rahilly is - "Men of Lightning" - followers of Lugaid, the Belgae celtic god of lightning. Iverni later became Euernii, which still later became "…rainn" and gave rise to the words -- …ire, Erin, Hibernia and Ireland.

The ancient origins of the Belgae Celts were in modern Belgium and later in southern "celtic" Britain before coming to Ireland c.500 BC as the "second" wave of celtic invaders. Germanic tribes constantly fought the Belgae Celts convincing many to leave for the island of Britain nearly three millenium ago. In Julius Caesar's "Gallic War" memoirs, he makes note of this ongoing conflict between the Belgae Celts and the german tribes on their eastern border. (Caesar gives high praise to the Belgae Celts for their efforts in holding off these Germanic tribes.)

In Ireland, the Belgae Celts defeated the Cruithni Celts and would for the next two centuries rule …ire from Co. Antrim south to Co. Cork. Just as the Cruithni were differentiated from the Picts (their tribal group) - the Belgae Celts became known as the "Fir Bolg" in Ireland. Later Irish Literati (gaelic tribal historians and church genealogists) often misdefined and maligned the name "Fir Bolg" - according to Tůmas F. ”Rahilly (himself of gaelic descent and the School of Celtic Studies, Dublin). He blames this problem on the gaelic historians who wrote for their benefactor gaelic chiefs the early prose and poems often disbarraging the non-gaelic Celts (Cruithin, Fir Bolg and Laghin) - and on church genealogists who wanted to remove any pagan druid reference to a 'god of lightning'. After the Gaels had taken control of …ire, these two literary groups set about creating gaelic pedigrees for many of the Fir Bolg clans - and changed their tribal group name to "…rainn". This then made the celtic tribal name of 'Fir Bolg' an inferior name for the people to use, and anyone continuing to refer to themselves this way would be considered of inferior status.

In Munster province, the …rainn (Fir Bolg) Celts had long been a powerful force and this would continue on for centuries to come, even under goidelic Gaelic control.

Around 500 BC the celtic La Tťne Culture developed on the european continent southeast of the Belgae Celts. It would for the next 400 years influence metalwork, art, painted pottery, jewelry, weapons and armour.

The other ancient Celtic peoples in …ire known as the - Cruithni, Laghin and Gaels - have famous surnames as well. A few of the Cruithni and Laginian Celtic tribes were also rewarded with "gaelic pedigrees" by early gaelic historians and church genealogists whose reasons for doing so are mentioned above.

For example, ”Rahilly states that the "Laginian" ”Kellys of Connacht (Galway/Roscommon) received a "pseudo" gaelic pedigree when in truth they were not of true Gaelic tribal stock. They were as stated of Laginian Celtic (Laighin) descent who had come to …ire c.300 BC, at least two centuries before the arrival of the Gaels. The Laginian Celts had departed from Armorica or Brittany peninsula in France, and they took control of both Leinster and Connacht provinces as their own till the last celtic invader - The Gaels (from northwest Spain) - arrived c.50 BC.

Here...a reader can view from this list of 218 surnames many …rainn celtic surnames that have left their mark on Ireland's history such as... ”Collins, MacNamara, ”Brien and ”Kennedy.

MacAleavy
MacBrody
MacCadden
MacCahan
MacClancy
MacClune
MacCogan
MacConchroe
MacConsidine
MacConway
MacCurtin
MacDonagher
MacDonnell
MacDorcey
MacDunlevy
MacEneiry
MacGilduff
MacGilfoyle
MacGilhooley
MacGill
MacGilpatrick
MacGorman
MacGrath
MacInerney
MacKeahan
MacKeogh
MacLarty
MacLevy
MacLysaght
MacMahon
MacMorrow
MacMurney
MacNally
MacNamara
MacNulty
MacShaffrey
MacSharry
MacSheedy
MacSherry
MacUlrick
”Ahern
”Anglin
O'Baire
”Barr
”Baskin
”Bilry
”Boden
”Bolan
”Brady
”Bregan
”Brennan
”Brick
”Brien
”Buckley
”Burrane
”Cagney
”Cahalane
”Cahill
”Canty
”Carney
”Carty
”Casey
”Cassidy
”Ciarrain
”Clerihan
”Cloherty
”Clohessy
”Coffey
”Coghlan
”Colleran
”Collins
”Comiskey
”Connell
”Connick
”Conroy
”Corby
O'Cornyn
”Cosgrove
”Coveny
”Coyne
”Creagh
”Croghan
”Cronelly
”Cronin
”Crotty
”Cullane
”Cullenan
”Curnin
”Curran
”Curry ”Dallaher
”Danaher
O'Davoren
”Dea
”Delaney
”Dineen
”Doheny
”Donegan
”Donnelly
”Donovan
”Doorley
”Downing
”Driscoll
”Duggan
”Dunlea
”Dunning
”Durack
”Dwyer
”Falvey
”Farrell
”Fealy
”Fennelly
”Fergus
”Fihelly
”Finn
”Flannagan
”Flannery
”Flynn
”Fogarty
”Furey
”Galvin
”Garrigan
”Gavan
”Gleeson
”Grady
”Griffy
”Gunning
”Hallahan
”Hallinan
”Hallissy
”Halloran
”Hanberry
”Hannan
”Hannon
”Hanraghty
”Hanrahan
”Haren
”Harkin
”Harrington
”Hartigan
”Haveran
”Hea
”Healy
”Heffernan
”Hegan
”Hehir
O'Henegan
”Hennessey
”Herlihy
”Hernon
”Hickey
”Hogan
”Honeen
”Hooghley
”Hurley
”Kealy
”Keane
”Kearney
”Keaty
”Keely
”Kelleher
”Kennedy
”Kieran
”Killeen
”Kinneally
”Kirwan
”Kissane
”Larkin
”Lavery
”Leahy
”Leary
”Leyne
”Liddane
”Liddy
”Lonergan
”Long
”Longan
”Longy
”Loughlin
”Lynch
”Malley
”Manchin
”Markahan
”Meara
”Minogue
”Molony
”Mongan
”Moran
”Moroney
”Moylan
”Mulholland
”Mullavill
”Mulleady
”Mullfover
”Mulvey
”Murnane
”Navin
”Neilan
”Noonan
”Phelan
”Quinlan
”Quin
”Quirke
”Regan
”Reidy
”Ronayne
”Roughan
”Rowan
”Scurry ”Shalvey
”Shanahan
”Shea
”Shelly
”Slowey
”Spillane
”Teige
”Toomey
”Tormey

Finally, a note should be made concerning the Fir Bolg (Belgae or …rainn) tribe known as the "DŠl Riata" of Co. Antrim. Around 500 AD they emigrated from Ireland to the Arglye region of western Scotland and helped give rise to the "Highlanders" of Scotland including several Scottish Kings.

Sources:
[National Archives of Ireland-1901 and 1911 Censuses; Early Irish History and Mythology-Tůmas F. O'Rahilly; Atlas Of The Celtic World-John Haywood; The Celts-John Haywood; The Dictionary of Irish Family Names-Ida Grehan; Heirlooms of Ireland-Joseph F. Osborne; The Book of Irish Families Great and Small-Michael C. O'Laughlin; The Surnames of Ireland-Edward MacLysaght; Irish Families-Edward MacLysaght; More Irish Families-Edward MacLysaght; National Park Service Civil War Roster; Clare County Library - Paddy Hannan Story, Surnames In Ireland-Robert Matheson; Irish Names And Surnames-Rev. Patrick Woulfe; Cromwellian Wars; Families of County Clare - IGF, Michael C. O'Laughlin; Families of County Limerick - IGF, O'Laughlin; The Annals of Ireland - The Four Masters, translated A.D. 1846, Irish Times.Com; "The Harp Of Old Erin & Banner Of Stars", "The Opinions of Paddy Magee" - The Irish Volunteer CD, David Kincaid; A New Genealogical Atlas Of Ireland-Brian Mitchell; How The Irish Saved Civilization-Thomas Cahill; Irish Family Mottoes-Tůmas ” Baoill]